RainbowBiz CIC

RainbowBiz CIC

RainbowBiz CIC

RainbowBiz promotes equality and diversity.

Digging Deeside

Wellbeing, gardening, bees, flowers.

Gardeners at allotmentChanging lives with like minded volunteers enhances wellbeing, gardening, bees and flowers.

Chat, joke, sing and dance, but understand differences, love not hate, we are in this together.
Working together in green spaces, enhancing nature, saving the bees from extinction, reducing global warming, trying to save the planet. Living life to the fullest for enriched lives.

Regular community gardening means that we get low-intensity physical activity.

There is evidence that gardeners live longer and are less stressed, pointing to both the physical and mental health benefits of gardening.  Sowing seeds or planting bulbs in your garden or at the allotments benefits many things.

Bees pollinating flowersGrow flowers, pollinators to save the bees. Flowers provide bees with nectar and pollen, which worker bees collect to feed their entire colonies. Bees provide flowers with the means to reproduce, by spreading pollen from flower to flower in a process called pollination. Without pollination, plants cannot create seeds.

Plant trees to reduce global warming. Trees and plants take in carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, theoretically planting enough trees should reduce carbon dioxide.

By gardening, the exercise you get from doing so burns off a lot of calories, relieves stress, lowers your blood pressure and spending time outside is good for your bones.

Wellbeing at allotment plantingWalking up down and all around the garden or the allotments, breathing in the fresh air, glancing at the green spaces, the wild flowers and the trees, listening to the birds and the insects as they search for feed or as they start their journey to migration or hibernation. Very heart warming.

Gardening is good for your mental health and enhances wellbeing, gardening, bees and flowers. You feel pride and joy as you work hard, to enhance nature. Sowing seeds by hand with great care, ensuring that the depth and the spacing of each seed or bulb is within its limits as per instructions for impending growth. Learning all of the time.

While the plants and trees grow, they inhale and exhale, so, the carbon that plants absorb from the atmosphere in photosynthesis becomes part of the soil when they die and decompose.

Wild birds help gardening by eating the plant eating insects to feed their young and by consuming weed seeds, to keep away unwanted plants.

By community gardening, mental health blossoms.

Isolating in the Garden

garden_isolating_rainbowbizHi my friends, I walked my first 6 laps of the back garden at 2pm this afternoon.  Sometimes when I’m walking around the garden a bee buzzes past me as if to say hi Daz, thank you for tending the wildflowers that provide pollen and nectar for us bees and other insects.

Today I’d only been outside for 30 seconds when the bee buzzed by. I have the feeling that the bees wait for me these days.

As I walked the garden there were clusters of daisies and dandelions, both of these wildflowers are important plants for pollinators in the UK daisies are important plants for pollinators, including beetles, ants, and moths.

growing_isolating_covid19

Dandelions are not the first source of pollen for bees. The pollen from dandelions is of poor quality, but better than nothing. They do provide a good source of nectar. A lawn full of dandelions is better for bees than a weed free lawn, but not nearly as good as a garden with a variety of plants and no dandelions.

So today I’ve walked 6 laps of the back garden and I’ll be walking 12 laps as usual today. Staying at home and exercising in my back garden is good for my self-isolation and saves me from catching the #covid19 virus. So therefore I am protecting the NHS and saving lives, including my own life.

Love from Daz xx

The Birds and Bees in the Back Garden

Bushes in the GardenWalking into the garden for light exercise and to listen to the birds and the bees is good for my body and my mental health.

Listening to the whistling of the birds or the buzzing of the bee brings happy smiles to my face and takes away any feelings of stress.

We need to look after and care for the birds and all of the insects in our gardens. Just like us, the birds and the insects need to eat and drink to survive diverse whether. I provide of fresh tap water in dishes for the birds: Birds need water to Bird Feederdrink and to bathe in, to keep their feathers in good condition to keep their body isolated in the winter Insects can drink water from the morning due, plants, fruit, raindrops or from the edges of ponds or puddles. Garden birds will eat, slugs, snails, worms, caterpillars, spiders and fruits berries from trees. Insects will eat leaves. Sucking insects poke tiny holes in leaves and draw the juices out of them.

Written by Daz Cook.

RainbowBiz CIC saved from closure after £10k ‘lifeline’

Photo Credit: Ginger Pixie Photography

A social enterprise that works with the most marginalised members of the North Wales community has been saved from closure after receiving £10,000 in emergency funding.

RainbowBiz CIC were facing a financial crisis after Covid-19 forced them to close their Hippy Shop in Mold, which used 100 per cent of its profits to sustain the work of the social enterprise.

With no money coming in staff feared they would have to end their work until the Steve Morgan Foundation gave them a £10,000 ‘lifeline’ to help them through the worst of the crisis.

The money will enable them to sustain the RainbowBiz Hippy Shop in Mold for the next three months and carry on working with their most vulnerable members.

RainbowBiz CIC director Sue Oliver said: “When Covid-19 struck our first thought was with the people we support.  We were forced to shut our Hippy Shop and were faced with the prospect of having to close the enterprise completely.

“Our work had previously been recognised by the Steve Morgan Foundation so we applied for financial assistance as part of their Covid-19 Emergency Fund and they awarded us £10,000. It was such a relief.”

Sarah Way, director and Hippy Shop manager said: “Not only is the shop our trading arm where we make money for our projects, it is also a gathering place for groups, volunteers, holistic therapists and our regular customers who we love to chat with.

“I am so relieved and humbled by this funding from the Steve Morgan Foundation that will keep our lovely shop from closing permanently.  The future looks bright again for us.”

The social enterprise will also be able to continue contacting members, including their weekly online social meet-up so people can socialise despite being housebound.

Steve Morgan, founder of the Steve Morgan Foundation, said: “Last year RainbowBiz CIC won the Best Entrepreneurial Social Enterprise Award at the Steve Morgan Foundation Awards for the work they do with the most marginalised members of the community.”

“Many of these people are extremely isolated and rely on projects like RainbowBiz  for social interaction and routine. That’s why we stepped in now so they can continue their good work when they’re needed the most.”

Morgan has committed to give £1m a week for an initial 12 weeks to charities in North Wales, Merseyside and Cheshire to help them carry on working with the vulnerable during Covid-19.

Digging Deeside Social Gardening Project

Sarah Way, Director of RainbowBiz CIC and Project Co-ordinator of the social gardening project Digging Deeside.

One of the regular groups, a social gardening project called Digging Deeside is now running a lockdown growing project called Let’s Grow Together.  This is to promote positive wellbeing, food sustainability and encourage everyone in the community to get involved.  Short videos are being shared of progress of seeds which are being grown and photographs which members of the community are being encouraged to send it which are then shared for everyone to see.  This is giving lots of inspiration and focus to the community who may not have grown anything from seed before. If you would like to get involved, please take a look at the Digging Deeside facebook page, you can also email your photographs and videos to info@rainbowbiz.org.uk  Let’s Grow Together!

Digging Deeside 19/8/2015

RainbowBiz_Digging_Deeside_Volunteer

New volunteers join Digging Deeside!

Today we had a few donations of plants and a composter.

Jobs carried out were:

Digging Over and planting the plants that we received.

Plants were: 
Red leaved Basil (Ocimum basilicum Purpurascens)
Lemon Basil (Ocimum americanum)

Seeds planted into bed were:

Lettuce  (Lactuca sativa)

Radish (Raphanus sativus)

Other jobs carried out were watering of plot and cultivating the ground ready for planting up.

We had a new volunteer join us today as well.

Digging Deeside 12 August 2015

Weekly Blog for Digging Deeside 

12/8/2015

Hello Diggers, 

lynda120815This week we had many donations of plants Claire donated a lovely thorn-less blackberry “Loch Ness” we also received a large verity of plants and 3 bags of Raspberry canes from one of our new volunteers Lynda.  

Jobs carried out this week:  

The plants are doing well thanks to digger Daz coming down to water every day.

After sorting through the donations we got to work on planting the Blackberry’s and Raspberry’s in the in ground plot making sure to make the holes deep enough when planting bare root plants its best to fill the dug hole with water to help the plant recover from being out of the ground and also you then don’t have to re-water after planting.  We also got the rest of the plants in that were propagated 3 weeks ago the plants were Leeks (Allium porrum) and Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare). 

We also had a good feel around the potato plants and got a good harvest of them.

We all had a good time and the weather was just right not to hot but not too cold.

Hope you have enjoyed reading this blog. Rob 🙂 

Digging Deeside 5 August 2015

RainbowBiz_DiggingDeeside_leafletOne of our fabulous volunteers and resident expert Rob has kindly agreed to do a weekly blog about the work carried out each week at our volunteer driven community project Digging Deeside.  We meet every week on a Wednesday between 10am and 12noon in the community allotment/gardens located at the back of the job centre in Connah’s Quay. EVERYONE IS WELCOME.

The project has turned into a very social occasion and we always make sure everyone has a cuppa and a biscuit.  Again, another volunteer Claire very kindly donated monies to keep us in milk and biscuits for many months!  One of the most important aspects of the project is to ensure that everyone is having a good time and feels welcome.

We often receive offers of kind donations, from seeds to tools stores and we will consider any donations as we do like to make use of these where possible.  If you would like more information about the project, please call Sarah on 07759 753 473 or email digging@rainbowbiz.org.uk


Hi all this is the first of the weekly blogs on the progress of the allotment.

Jobs that were done today Planting out of the seedlings that were brought back to the allotment, after being looked after by Rob one of the volunteers. They were planted 2 weeks ago and the plants were:

• Dwarf Runner Beans (Phaseolus coccineus)
• Kale (Brassica oleraca Acephala Group)
• French Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris)
• Courgette (Cucurbita pepo)
• Cabbage (Brassica oleraca Capitata Group)

Other jobs carried out were to hand harvest the best potatoes that were ready and left the small ones alone. All this was done by feeling around in the soil around the base of the plant this is a good tip as the rest of the potatoes will continue to grow so you can get a better yield from the plant. And also waging war on the mare’s tail (Equisetum arvense) which is an ongoing war!

Digging_Deeside_Carl_Sargeant